Crosstalk:
Interviews Conducted by David Langford

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Crosstalk

Over the years from 1976 into the new century, David Langford interviewed a number of sf and fantasy authors for various publications. The results, some of them acclaimed and even reprinted, are now at last gathered in this slim volume along with a new and mercifully brief introduction.

To see this introduction, the contents page and a couple of short sample interviews, go to the Lulu.com product page for this book and click the "Preview" link under the cover image.

Full disclosure: the cover artwork is lifted without permission from that invaluable reference work on phrenology, L.A. Vaught's Practical Character Reader (1902). I knew it would come in useful one day. The back cover shows even more ears from the same source.

Lulu.com book description: Fifteen interviews in which David Langford questions science fiction and fantasy notables: Stephen Baxter, John Clute and John Grant, John Clute solo, George Hay, Tom Holt, Terry Pratchett with Jack Cohen and Ian Stewart, Terry Pratchett solo (twice), Christopher Priest, Alastair Reynolds, John Sladek, Bob Shaw, Kevin Smith and Ian Watson. CROSSTALK collects all these conversations for the first time in book form.

  • Publication Date: June 2015
  • Publisher: Ansible Editions
  • Format: Trade paperback
  • ISBN: 978-1-326-29982-8
  • Page Count: 111
  • Price: $12.00
  • Availability: Lulu.com

Reviews and Comments

Steve Davidson, Amazing Stories, 13 July 2015

Crosstalk is a very comfortable read and offers a window into the lives and process of some of the most recognizable names in the industry. The span of years covered makes this collection a bit of an historical exercise as well, particularly with the Pratchett and Priest pieces (not to mention Bob Shaw). The book is well worth its investment, even if you’re only interested in one of the authors covered. You’ll read that interview and David’s style will draw you in, after which you’ll want to read the rest.

Crosstalk is highly recommended, even if you don’t have an abiding interest in fan history.