All Good Things:
The Last SFX Visions

Read the reviews

All Good Things

David Langford's long-running column in every issue of SFX magazine, from number 1 in June 1995 to number 274 in July 2016, was a favourite with the magazine's readers but eventually succumbed to budget cuts ordered from on high at Future Publications. There have been two past collections of these pieces, The Sex Column (2005) and Starcombing (2009, also containing much non-SFX material). All Good Things: The Last SFX Visions completes the SFX sequence and also includes additional pieces written for The New York Review of Science Fiction and elsewhere, making a total of 100 articles plus a new introduction.

The cover is by regular column illustrator Andy Watt (from SFX 250), and several more of his tasty cartoons are reprinted as interior art.

  • Publication Date: 21 April 2017
  • Publisher: Steel Quill, nonfiction imprint of NewCon Press
  • Format: Trade paperback with interior illustrations by Andy Watt in black and white
  • ISBN: 978-1-910935-44-6
  • Page Count: 238
  • Cover Art: Andy Watt
  • Price: £12.99
  • Availability: NewCon PressBook Depository
  • Publication Date: 21 April 2017
  • Publisher: Steel Quill, nonfiction imprint of NewCon Press
  • Format: Limited edition hardback with interior illustrations by Andy Watt in colour
  • ISBN: 978-1-910935-43-9
  • Page Count: 238
  • Cover Art: Andy Watt
  • Price: £24.99
  • Availability: NewCon PressBook Depository

Reviews and Comments

Stephen Theaker, Theaker's Quarterly, 24 March 2017

Sometimes, though, it’s more specific than that. More personal. The reviewer, happily working his way through the pile of to-be-reads and sorting them into the read-in-beds and the better-off-deads, comes across a book by an author who has earned his enmity, his anger, his wrath, his undying thirst for literary vengeance. Maybe this new book was written by someone who, a mere fifteen years before, described the reviewer’s second self-published book as “a Stainless Steel Rat adventure with important organs missing”. Or perhaps this new book was written by someone who said it was dire, “mercifully short”, or “memorably forgettable”, or at their kindest said it was “refreshingly pointless”.